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Art Photo Collector

Posts tagged sfmoma:

"They were … pure and unadulterated photographs, and sometimes they hinted at the existence of visual truths that had escaped all other systems of detection."—John Szarkowski

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has recently opened, for the first time in 25 years, a major retrospective of the singular American photographer, Garry Winogrand. This is a big deal. The exhibit, organized and curated in conjunction with the National Gallery of Art, will later travel to DC and then on to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York this summer. Given Winogrand's importance in the history of 20th Century photography, this will be one of the major shows of 2013.

Professional photographers, long before the days of digital, have always burned through rolls of film, snapping thousands and thousands of images. Winogrand was no exception. When he passed in 1984, he left behind dozens of marked-up proof sheets and more than 6,500 rolls of undeveloped film containing more than 250,000 images. What makes this retrospective particularly important is that nearly a third of the images in the show have never been printed or exhibited, creating a renewed and exciting opportunity to take a greater in-depth look at Winogrand's legacy. 

The forthcoming monograph to accompany the exhibit will also provide scholars and enthusiasts with a comprehensive resource for examining his importance and lasting influence on photography. Winogrand forever changed how photographers see, but it’s also worth noting that he expanded the possibilities of what happens in the frame. —Lane Nevares

 

"A single photograph is a mere fragment of an experience and, simultaneously, the distillation of the entire body of one’s experience." —Shomei Tomatsu

Tomorrow night in Cologne, Germany the Galerie Priska Pasquer will host a vernissage for the great Japanese photographer, Shomei Tomatsu. While still not widely known in the States, Tomatsu is, without question, one of Japan’s most important photographers. 

Born in 1930, Tomatsu came of age in the devastating aftermath of post-WWII Japan. A quiet, reserved and self-taught photographer, he would first go on to document the atomic devastation in Nagasaki as he discusses in this brief video.  Later, however, his work would follow the changing dynamism of Japanese culture and society as it emerged from the war and into the bright lights of capitalism and consumerism.

We can thank the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art for first bringing Shomei Tomatsu to the attention of a broader American audience.  Their groundbreaking retrospective, "Skin of the Nation" in 2006, helped us to understand the importance of Tomatsu’s work. And today, Aperture magazine’s latest fall issue #208 displays a Tomatsu image on the cover and a feature on his work in Okinawa.

I invite you to explore Shomei Tomatsu’s legacy and to discover for yourself, why the sensitivity, power and grace of his images have influenced Japanese photography for generations. —Lane Nevares


"When I get an idea for a picture, I never ask how much it’s going to cost or how difficult it’s going to be, I just follow my imagination." Alex Prager

The artist, Alex Prager’s, latest project Compulsion has the impressive distinction of simultaneously being on view this month in London at the Michael Hoppen Gallery, in New York at Yancey Richardson Gallery, and in Los Angeles at M+B.   Also on exhibit is her latest short film, La Petite Mort, starring French actress Judith Godrèche. 

Prager’s work is refreshing and cinematic.  A self-taught photographer and one with a definite west coast vibe, her large scale work is already in major collections, including the MoMA and the Whitney Museum of American Art here in New York, and the San Francisco MoMA.  Her popularity is ever increasing.  In fact, much of her latest show in New York is already sold-out.  She is a major rising star in the fine art photography sky. 

For a look behind-the-scenes, this video is an excellent introduction into her work and her process as an artist.  For collectors and admirers of her work, Alex Prager is hot and someone to watch.  —Lane Nevares

"She had few boundaries and made art out of nothing: empty rooms with peeling wallpaper and just her figure. No elaborate stage set-up or lights.  Her process struck me more the way a painter works, making do with what’s right in front of her, rather than photographers like myself who need time to plan out what they’re going to do."  —Cindy Sherman on Francesca Woodman

After a successful run at the SFMOMA, the Francesca Woodman show opens today at The Guggenheim here in New York.  While a lot of attention is being given these days (and rightly so) to the artist, Cindy Sherman, who has a major retrospective at the MoMA, I am predicting that attendance to see Francesca Woodman at the The Guggenheim will exceed all expectations.  And most importantly, it will introduce and inspire a new generation to her transformative work. 

Also worth noting, the documentary film The Woodmans (2011) provides a fascinating insight into her work, her family and her life. It is essential viewing for anyone interested in discovering more about this young, ambitious, and ultimately tragic artist.  —Lane Nevares

"The unconscious obsession that we photographers have is that wherever we go, we want to find the theme that we carry inside ourselves."  Graciela Iturbide


Mexico’s contribution to the history of photography is important, and one I would argue, often underestimated.  Tomorrow, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s exhibit "Photography in Mexico" opens to address that perception.  With over 150 images from more than 30 photographers spanning the fertile cultural period after the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) to the present day, the exhibit will explore the cultural and ideological strands that have woven their way through the 20th Century and into our 21st. 

Kudos to the SFMOMA for organizing another great show and for providing the opportunity to explore a rich and diverse photographic history, one that is becoming much more internationalized/globalized as we move deeper into the new century.  —Lane Nevares


“I finally managed to try to do away with myself, as  neatly and concisely as possible…. I would rather die young leaving  various accomplishments, some work, my friendship with you, and some  other artifacts intact, instead of pell-mell erasing all of these  delicate things.”—Francesca Woodman
Francesca Woodman is regaining (quite rightly) a lot of attention these days—some thirty years after she took her own life. Suicide at any age is a terrible tragedy, and at the age of 22, Francesca Woodman ended a life/career she might never have imagined would lead to such a powerful, posthumous reputation.
Her work is self-reflective, surrealistic and complex. Looking at her images it’s impossible not to feel the deep emotional undercurrents that must have been going on while she was working.  And knowing her life ended in suicide makes it difficult to engage her work outside of that prism.  If she were alive today, how would we feel about her work? 
Noted Art critic Arthur Danto wrote: "It is impossible to view her work without being drawn into the vast  questions it raises about life, art and the meaning and embodiment of  sex…. Her work unfolds over time like the oeuvre of a brilliant and  precocious poet, like Keats or Rimbaud, whose voice is present in  every  line."
The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s current exhibit of her work will end in one week on February 20th.  Next month, for those of us on the east coast, The Guggenheim will open a Francesca Woodman show on the 16th of March.  My hat’s off to both museums and their teams for putting on these retrospectives, and giving us the opportunity not only to see work that’s never been exhibited, but more importantly, to reconsider Francesca Woodman’s legacy.  Lane Nevares

“I finally managed to try to do away with myself, as neatly and concisely as possible…. I would rather die young leaving various accomplishments, some work, my friendship with you, and some other artifacts intact, instead of pell-mell erasing all of these delicate things.”—Francesca Woodman

Francesca Woodman is regaining (quite rightly) a lot of attention these days—some thirty years after she took her own life. Suicide at any age is a terrible tragedy, and at the age of 22, Francesca Woodman ended a life/career she might never have imagined would lead to such a powerful, posthumous reputation.

Her work is self-reflective, surrealistic and complex. Looking at her images it’s impossible not to feel the deep emotional undercurrents that must have been going on while she was working.  And knowing her life ended in suicide makes it difficult to engage her work outside of that prism.  If she were alive today, how would we feel about her work? 

Noted Art critic Arthur Danto wrote: "It is impossible to view her work without being drawn into the vast questions it raises about life, art and the meaning and embodiment of sex…. Her work unfolds over time like the oeuvre of a brilliant and precocious poet, like Keats or Rimbaud, whose voice is present in every line."

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s current exhibit of her work will end in one week on February 20th.  Next month, for those of us on the east coast, The Guggenheim will open a Francesca Woodman show on the 16th of March.  My hat’s off to both museums and their teams for putting on these retrospectives, and giving us the opportunity not only to see work that’s never been exhibited, but more importantly, to reconsider Francesca Woodman’s legacy.  Lane Nevares



“I think I found a language, how to show things, that can make you look  at things in a slightly different way than what you’re used to.” Rineke Dijkstra
If you’re not already familiar with the work of Rineke Dijkstra, then I invite you to have a deeper look at this remarkable photographer. Much has been written and said about her work and I won’t add to the chatter, but leave you to make up your own mind.  In fact, hearing what she has to say is actually much better.  Next month on February 19th the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will launch the first mid-career retrospective of her work.  The show will later travel to New York’s Guggenheim, where it will open on June 29th.  With over 70 images spanning her career on display, I for one am already excited to see what will most likely be one of the top photo shows of 2012. —Lane Nevares
From SFMOMA: In works of classical simplicity and remarkable psychological depth,  Dutch artist Rineke Dijkstra presents a contemporary take on the genre  of portraiture. Whether adolescents, soldiers, or new mothers, Dijkstra  is fascinated by people in states of significant transition. Her  sensitive pictures generate a monumental sense of presence, not only in  how they record the details of an individual’s physical appearance, but  also in how they illuminate subtly shifting inner states. The scale and  ambition of Dijkstra’s photographs connects them to a Dutch tradition of  portraiture stretching back to Rembrandt and Frans Hals. Bringing  together 70 large-scale color photographs and five video installations,  this is the artist’s first major retrospective in the United States.http://www.sfmoma.org/exhib_events/exhibitions/438#ixzz1kcbG7gDk

“I think I found a language, how to show things, that can make you look at things in a slightly different way than what you’re used to.” Rineke Dijkstra

If you’re not already familiar with the work of Rineke Dijkstra, then I invite you to have a deeper look at this remarkable photographer. Much has been written and said about her work and I won’t add to the chatter, but leave you to make up your own mind.  In fact, hearing what she has to say is actually much better.  Next month on February 19th the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will launch the first mid-career retrospective of her work.  The show will later travel to New York’s Guggenheim, where it will open on June 29th.  With over 70 images spanning her career on display, I for one am already excited to see what will most likely be one of the top photo shows of 2012. —Lane Nevares

  • From SFMOMA: In works of classical simplicity and remarkable psychological depth, Dutch artist Rineke Dijkstra presents a contemporary take on the genre of portraiture. Whether adolescents, soldiers, or new mothers, Dijkstra is fascinated by people in states of significant transition. Her sensitive pictures generate a monumental sense of presence, not only in how they record the details of an individual’s physical appearance, but also in how they illuminate subtly shifting inner states. The scale and ambition of Dijkstra’s photographs connects them to a Dutch tradition of portraiture stretching back to Rembrandt and Frans Hals. Bringing together 70 large-scale color photographs and five video installations, this is the artist’s first major retrospective in the United States.http://www.sfmoma.org/exhib_events/exhibitions/438#ixzz1kcbG7gDk