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Art Photo Collector

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"I’d say most of my inspiration was drawn from old-school American values mixed with a little punk-rock idealism."—Mike Brodie

Mike Brodie’s new monograph, A Period of Juvenile Prosperity has just been released in time for his two forthcoming solo shows: one in LA and one in NYC. For a diesel-engine mechanic who thinks of photography as a “hobby,” this is mighty impressive. 

Many will look at these images of young travelers living free and criss-crossing the USA as something raw and exciting, but like many things in life—“Riding the Rails” isn’t anything new. In fact, during the Great Depression more than 250,000+ homeless teenagers were doing the same. The excellent documentary, Riding the Rails, tells the story of these young people and the effect that experience had on the rest of their lives.

Brodie’s images, however, tell an American, 21st Century story that is about freedom, possibility, and opting-out from society’s dictates. These young people (who may be fleeing tough circumstances themselves) are choosing to live a different way of life. Brodie’s friends, lovers, and fellow travelers show us the rough, the real, and the nitty-gritty of life on the move.

Self-taught, Brodie is an innately talented photographer with a great sense of light and composition. This series is strong, sensitive, authentic, and will be one of the important photography shows to see in March. I am looking forward to seeing the exhibit and buying the book. (I am also including this show on my upcoming gallery tour.) Brodie’s photographs have made me eager to discover other artists, especially those outside of the States, who are living and documenting life on the road. —Lane Nevares 

"The road must eventually lead to the whole world."—Kerouac, On the Road

“I believe everyone in your dreams represents a psychological aspect of yourself. So the whole Guest group is offered as an extended self-portrait - females and all.”—Chris Bucklow

The Danziger Gallery in New York has recently opened its second solo show of Christopher Bucklow’s arresting photograms. While certainly not a departure, artistically speaking, from his past photographic work, these photograms are nevertheless beautiful to behold. 

Light on paper. Each print is a unique display: the sun’s rays poring through thousands of pinhole apertures in an aluminum foil sheet mapping a human silhouette, each photogram reflecting the length of exposure and intensity of the sun at a given moment. The final result is singular and ethereal, a Cibachrome print that is its own negative. 

Beauty is a worthy pursuit whatever the medium. Bucklow’s love of light and color, along with the psychological underpinnings of this work, give these photograms their staying power. Already part of many major museums and collections, Bucklow’s sun-fueled photographs remind us that it’s ok to believe in our dreams. —Lane Nevares

"It (taking photographs) is all about longing…without longing—no pictures at all."  —Anders Petersen

One of the nicest gifts I received this year is Anders Petersen’s latest monograph, ”Soho.” In collaboration with London’s noted Photographers’ Gallery and Mack Books, Petersen was given a four-week residency last year to shoot images of an area in London known for many things to many people. For Petersen, it was an opportunity to return to a place he’d known in the 70’s and could re-discover, thirty years later, through the lens.

While there are many impressive photographers working today, Anders Petersen is one of the finest. I am consistently astonished at the power of his photographs. His ability to infuse images with a poetic gaze that senses fragility and yearns for Beauty is the mark of an artist in love with his craft, and more importantly, in love with people. I can keep returning to his work and always find something deeper, more resonant. 

For a peek inside the book here’s a video. But I recommend discovering his work, first hand, in print. Call me old-fashioned, but I still believe in the magic of the photobook. —Lane Nevares

"Inspiration surrounds me. I can find it in the sprawling metropolis that I call home, the barren landscapes of the desert or in the classic beauty of the female form. My photography is a diverse mix, yet my approach is always the same – embrace the subject." —Clay Lipsky 

Clay Lipsky’s photography reveals his passions.  An LA-based artist, Lipsky’s work covers a remarkable range of interests.  His various books and projects attest to this keen curiosity and urgency to explore. What remains consistent throughout his work, however, is his love of light and composition.  One can always tell it’s a Clay Lipsky image.

I became of fan of Lipsky’s work last year and immediately contacted him to collaborate with Nevares Fine Art.   It’s exciting to work with someone who’s constantly evolving and challenging himself to produce distinctive work.  Collectors and curators are taking note, and I’m excited to see where the muses take him.  —Lane Nevares

“I hope these images will make people think about what it’s like to observe these laws.”  Ronnen Safdie

The Israeli-American artist Michal Ronnen Safdie, as evidenced on her website, has a diverse body of work: from scenes of vapor trails across a sky, to refugees in Darfur, to portraits of trees, to life in Israel.  Her current show, "Sunday Tuesday Thursday", on exhibit at the Andrea Meislin Gallery here in New York offers a fascinating view into a world most of us know little about it, much less have seen.  The series takes its title from the three days of the week that Orthodox Jewish women are allowed, sans men, to go to this beach just north of Tel Aviv, Israel. 

Ronnen Safdie’s images, while seemingly innocuous, are actually potent explorations/challenges to women’s role in contemporary Israeli society.  Looking at these women, burdened as they are by religious constraints, is intriguing and something new to behold.  It is this power to reveal and to raise questions, that give the photographs their strength.  —Lane Nevares

  • From the photographer Jasper James:“Sometime in 2008, the number of people living in urban areas outnumbered those living in rural areas for the first time in history. I thought it would be interesting to shoot portraits of these city dwellers combined with the image of a cityscape.”

I love it when a photographer can make us see things anew.  Without any artifice, Jasper James series "City Silhouettes" reveals the city through the individual, the urban through the human, and the exterior through the interior.  How many photographers can do that so well and so elegantly?  Mr. James proves again that “ideas” are the engines that generate great work.  Lane Nevares

Nan Goldin’s latest show “Scopophilia” (the love of looking) is luscious in its use of color and light, and with the pairing of works from the Louvre, creates something altogether sublime. Of course there’s been blather about taking historic works of art and pairing theme with a contemporary photographer’s work, but it’s not too often a great photographer is given permission to work alone in the Louvre, and given a show there as well. The French certainly appreciate her. Describing her experience working alone in the Louvre on Tuesdays when the museum is closed, “It was one of the most sensuous experiences of my life,” she said.  “And I’ve had a lot of sensual experiences in my life.”
The 25 minute video installation, “Scopophilia,” also on view is not to be missed. Hearing Nan Goldin’s voice, listening to the music of Alain Mahé, and  seeing wonderful images from inside the Louvre, along with Nan Goldin’s  own work, were compelling and poetic. The video is an excellent prelude to seeing the rest of the exhibit.
"Scopophilia" is a deep and romantic body of work, stretching into the past to remind us how ideas of Beauty transcend time.  Only someone of Nan Goldin’s artistic caliber, and I’d argue emotional depth, can make this work successfully.  And she does.
The “love of looking,” indeed.
—Lane Nevares
'Scopophilia' will exhibit at Matthew Marks Gallery until December 23.

Nan Goldin’s latest show “Scopophilia” (the love of looking) is luscious in its use of color and light, and with the pairing of works from the Louvre, creates something altogether sublime. Of course there’s been blather about taking historic works of art and pairing theme with a contemporary photographer’s work, but it’s not too often a great photographer is given permission to work alone in the Louvre, and given a show there as well. The French certainly appreciate her. Describing her experience working alone in the Louvre on Tuesdays when the museum is closed, “It was one of the most sensuous experiences of my life,” she said. “And I’ve had a lot of sensual experiences in my life.”

The 25 minute video installation, “Scopophilia,” also on view is not to be missed. Hearing Nan Goldin’s voice, listening to the music of Alain Mahé, and seeing wonderful images from inside the Louvre, along with Nan Goldin’s own work, were compelling and poetic. The video is an excellent prelude to seeing the rest of the exhibit.

"Scopophilia" is a deep and romantic body of work, stretching into the past to remind us how ideas of Beauty transcend time.  Only someone of Nan Goldin’s artistic caliber, and I’d argue emotional depth, can make this work successfully.  And she does.

The “love of looking,” indeed.

—Lane Nevares


Fleur by Natalie Obermaier
While quietly viewing Natalie Obermaier’s portrait work, I am reminded once again of what makes a photo resonate.  Sure, there is the technical excellence she brings, using her Hasselblad camera, black & white film, and available light, but I return again and again to Natalie’s work because I feel the emotional pull.  Natalie and her subjects are connected, sharing, and engaged in discovering.  In creating a safe and loving atmosphere, Natalie is able to capture an indescribable “something,” (call it a je ne sais quoi) from her subjects, that is distinct, and I believe quite special.  Few artists today are able to take such exquisite portraits of children.  Natalie Obermaier is poised for great things. —Lane Nevares

Fleur by Natalie Obermaier

While quietly viewing Natalie Obermaier’s portrait work, I am reminded once again of what makes a photo resonate.  Sure, there is the technical excellence she brings, using her Hasselblad camera, black & white film, and available light, but I return again and again to Natalie’s work because I feel the emotional pull.  Natalie and her subjects are connected, sharing, and engaged in discovering.  In creating a safe and loving atmosphere, Natalie is able to capture an indescribable “something,” (call it a je ne sais quoi) from her subjects, that is distinct, and I believe quite special.  Few artists today are able to take such exquisite portraits of children.  Natalie Obermaier is poised for great things. —Lane Nevares