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Art Photo Collector

Posts tagged american:

"Being generous of spirit is a wonderful way to live."—Pete Seeger

Music, Photography and Film: the understated artist John Cohen's multi-faceted career has fused all three. Cohen, who has known and documented some of this country's seminal Americans, including Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, Jack Kerouac and many others, is represented by L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, who was kind enough recently to educate me on this man, of whom I knew little, behind many of these iconic images.

John Cohen, now in his eighties, has led a remarkable career as a filmmaker, photographer and noted musician/musicologist. Despite his association with many famous artists (and his folk band The New City Lost Ramblers) he is not widely recognized to a contemporary audience. I suspect, though, that for a man whose archive and legacy is now housed at The Library of Congress and whose work is in the permanent collections of many major museums, these accomplishments are far more satisfying than the ephemera of fame.

Cohen is still going. You can catch him performing this weekend at the Brooklyn Folk Festival, if you’re feeling generous of spirit and in need of some down home music and fun. —Lane Nevares

"The exercise of democracy begins as exercise, as walking around, becoming familiar with the streets, comfortable with strangers, able to imagine your own body as powerful and expressive rather than a pawn."—Rebecca Solnit

The photographer Richard Renaldi isn’t afraid to talk to people. For nearly seven years he has been approaching strangers throughout the United States and asking them to pose, along with another complete stranger, for his large format 8 x 10 camera. This ongoing series, “Touching Strangers,” is now a new monograph from Aperture, with an exhibit opening tomorrow night. 

In these images, body language reveals everything. We look at these folks looking at us and understand that we’re all sharing a moment. Once the shutter’s released, the magic is frozen. Yes, we know it will never happen again, these individuals will probably never again meet each other, but what remains is the touch. And most importantly, the idea that we are, despite the negative aspects of our culture to dictate otherwise, humanly connected. —Lane Nevares

"I gotta roll, I can’t stand still. Got a flamin’ heart, can’t get my fill. …Didn’t take long ‘fore I found out, what people mean by down and out."Led Zeppelin

Philip-Lorca diCorcia was awarded a prestigious National Endowment for the Arts fellowship in 1989. He took the $45,000 grant money, his 6 x 9 Linhof camera, an assistant, and headed to Los Angeles to create, what has since become, one of his most memorable series, “Hustlers.” These dispassionate portraits of male prostitutes, including a forthcoming monograph from Steidl, are now on display at David Zwirner gallery in New York.

This important exhibit marks 20 years since diCorcia’s first solo show in 1993 at the Museum of Modern Art. The new show offers 40 photographs (along with 15 newly produced works) each notably captioned with the name, age, hometown, and the amount of government-sponsored money diCorcia paid for the hustler’s time.

More than twenty years later these classic, diCorcia images still resonate. What’s different, however, is that now in our 21st Century of universal, instantaneous information, the transaction cost for human flesh is widely understood. —Lane Nevares

"…Precisely at this historical moment, when multicultural democracy is the order of the day, Photography can be be used as powerful weapon toward instituting political and cultural change. I for one will continue to work towards this end."—-Carrie Mae Weems 

The 28th of August will mark the 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther King’s heroic “I have a Dream” speech. In these times of an historic African American President and the realities of Justice exposed by the Trayvon Martin case, I am thankful that we have artists like Ms. Weems fearlessly confronting the complexities of race, gender and class in our American culture.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is presently featuring a major (and deserved) retrospective of her work, titled “Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video.” The retrospective will be up until the 29th of September, and for anyone in the area, is a must-see. If you’re unfamiliar with Carrie Mae Weems’s body of work and her contributions, now is an opportunity to look through her eyes and see what’s been going on “from sea to shining sea.”  —Lane Nevares

"For the Persian poet Rumi, each human life is analogous to a bowl floating on the surface of an infinite ocean. As it moves along, it is slowly filling with the water around it. That’s a metaphor for the acquisition of knowledge. When the water in the bowl finally reaches the same level as the water outside, there is no longer any need for the container, and it drops away as the inner water merges with the outside water. We call this the moment of death. That analogy returns to me over and over as a metaphor for ourselves."—-Bill Viola
The American artist, Bill Viola’s, most recent show, Frustrated Actions and Futile Gestures, opened last week at BlainISouthern gallery in London. For anyone remotely familiar with Viola’s work, this is an exciting opportunity to see nine new works created between 2012-2013. 
For more than 40 years, Bill Viola has transformed our ideas about art and video. He and his partner Kira Perov have truly been at the vanguard, fusing Eastern mystical and spiritual traditions into modern works that take us deeply into emotional and philosophical territory. Sometimes cathartically so. Slow down, spend three and half minutes, and watch his new work Inner Passage. Fill your bowl. —Lane Nevares

 

"For the Persian poet Rumi, each human life is analogous to a bowl floating on the surface of an infinite ocean. As it moves along, it is slowly filling with the water around it. That’s a metaphor for the acquisition of knowledge. When the water in the bowl finally reaches the same level as the water outside, there is no longer any need for the container, and it drops away as the inner water merges with the outside water. We call this the moment of death. That analogy returns to me over and over as a metaphor for ourselves."—-Bill Viola

The American artist, Bill Viola’s, most recent show, Frustrated Actions and Futile Gestures, opened last week at BlainISouthern gallery in London. For anyone remotely familiar with Viola’s work, this is an exciting opportunity to see nine new works created between 2012-2013. 

For more than 40 years, Bill Viola has transformed our ideas about art and video. He and his partner Kira Perov have truly been at the vanguard, fusing Eastern mystical and spiritual traditions into modern works that take us deeply into emotional and philosophical territory. Sometimes cathartically so. Slow down, spend three and half minutes, and watch his new work Inner Passage. Fill your bowl. —Lane Nevares

 

"They were … pure and unadulterated photographs, and sometimes they hinted at the existence of visual truths that had escaped all other systems of detection."—John Szarkowski

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has recently opened, for the first time in 25 years, a major retrospective of the singular American photographer, Garry Winogrand. This is a big deal. The exhibit, organized and curated in conjunction with the National Gallery of Art, will later travel to DC and then on to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York this summer. Given Winogrand's importance in the history of 20th Century photography, this will be one of the major shows of 2013.

Professional photographers, long before the days of digital, have always burned through rolls of film, snapping thousands and thousands of images. Winogrand was no exception. When he passed in 1984, he left behind dozens of marked-up proof sheets and more than 6,500 rolls of undeveloped film containing more than 250,000 images. What makes this retrospective particularly important is that nearly a third of the images in the show have never been printed or exhibited, creating a renewed and exciting opportunity to take a greater in-depth look at Winogrand's legacy. 

The forthcoming monograph to accompany the exhibit will also provide scholars and enthusiasts with a comprehensive resource for examining his importance and lasting influence on photography. Winogrand forever changed how photographers see, but it’s also worth noting that he expanded the possibilities of what happens in the frame. —Lane Nevares