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Art Photo Collector

Posts tagged Street Photography:

“Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”—Franz Kafka

Mark Cohen, born in 1943, is a native of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. To a 21st Century audience, he’s perhaps not as well known, but for over 40 years he’s been documenting his local community and building a foundation from which many photographers (consciously or not) have tread upon. As early as 1973, John Szarkowski recognized his talent and showed his work for the first time at MoMA. Now, in 2014, the Danziger Gallery in New York is representing his work and giving him a new solo show that opened last week.

Cohen’s flair for using strong off-camera flash, a wide angle lens, and avoiding the viewfinder (while shooting with the camera away from his body) bring an immediacy to his images. Like Bruce Gilden, who’s no stranger to the close, flash-in-your-face approach, Cohen’s surrealistic style is reflective of his personality. This video shows him in action, moving, shooting, talking and constantly on alert for the next frame.

Now in his 70’s, Mark Cohen has kept his ability to see beauty and to remain young. Any photographer who creates work this good (not to mention his superb color work), merits all the attention he receives. The show is up until June 20th and a must-see. Never grow old. —Lane Nevares

"The walls are the publishers of the poor."—Eduardo Galeano

You may not know the names Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski, but these collectors own the most important private collection of Latin American Photography in the world. Major works from their collection will be part of the ICP’s new exhibition, Urbes Mutantes (Mutant Cities), opening on Saturday here in New York.

This show, featuring over 200 images, draws from photographers across the continent, exploring the city as nexus between society’s cultural and political forces. Curator Alexis Fabry writes, "As the 20th century progressed, amidst struggles for social justice and in defense of democracy and freedom, the city became a setting for uprisings and revolutions. Images became as important as the stories covering the events that shaped these Latin American nations.” 

My ignorance of Latin American photography makes me keen to discover more about this significant photographic history. We often read or hear about the events, but we don’t always get the chance to appreciate the artists behind these struggles, to learn who they are and what their contributions mean. Too often it is through the prism of American image makers that we see the world. “Urbes Mutantes” is of the people and for the people, and like a city, may change how we see ourselves. —Lane Nevares 

"They were … pure and unadulterated photographs, and sometimes they hinted at the existence of visual truths that had escaped all other systems of detection."—John Szarkowski

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has recently opened, for the first time in 25 years, a major retrospective of the singular American photographer, Garry Winogrand. This is a big deal. The exhibit, organized and curated in conjunction with the National Gallery of Art, will later travel to DC and then on to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York this summer. Given Winogrand's importance in the history of 20th Century photography, this will be one of the major shows of 2013.

Professional photographers, long before the days of digital, have always burned through rolls of film, snapping thousands and thousands of images. Winogrand was no exception. When he passed in 1984, he left behind dozens of marked-up proof sheets and more than 6,500 rolls of undeveloped film containing more than 250,000 images. What makes this retrospective particularly important is that nearly a third of the images in the show have never been printed or exhibited, creating a renewed and exciting opportunity to take a greater in-depth look at Winogrand's legacy. 

The forthcoming monograph to accompany the exhibit will also provide scholars and enthusiasts with a comprehensive resource for examining his importance and lasting influence on photography. Winogrand forever changed how photographers see, but it’s also worth noting that he expanded the possibilities of what happens in the frame. —Lane Nevares

 

"I explore with the credo that it is safe to go anywhere as long as the small, quiet, simply constructed box is nestled under my arm." —Donna Ferrato 

The noted LOOK3 photo festival kicks off today in Charlottesville, Virginia.  Billed as: “3 days of peace, love and photography, the Festival is designed to bring together the international photography community and create opportunities for attendees and artists to share images, ideas, and to be inspired.” 

One of the photographers (among many) that I am looking forward to seeing discuss their work is New York-based, Donna Ferrato.  While she is well-known for her work documenting domestic violence and abuse against women, Ferrato’s street-photography is also outstanding. 

LOOK3 is a great opportunity to bring everyone in the photo community (and beyond) together to explore, learn, meet and to have some fun.  This will be my first experience there, and while I look forward to attending, I also look forward to coming home freshly inspired. —Lane Nevares

"The truth is that anyone can make a photo. The trouble is not that photos are hard to make. The trouble is that photos are hard to make intelligent and interesting." —John Szarkowski 

I recalled this quote recently while visiting the NY Photo Festival last week in Brooklyn. I enjoyed many of the exhibits, but I came away feeling that the Tokyo-Ga show was the stand-out.  The founder and curator, Ms. Naoko Ohta, has assembled quite a fantastic selection of contemporary Japanese photographers, many of whom were unknown to me.  I am happy to discover the work of two young photographers in particular, Masami Yamamoto and Junpei Kato .  

Yamamoto’s images offer mystery and chiaroscuro, while Kato’s clean lines and colors transcend banal, urban surfaces.  Both photographers are distinctly different, but are alike in how they capture Beauty by taking simplicity and giving it meaning—not an easy thing to do, but the results are intelligent and interesting. —Lane Nevares