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Art Photo Collector

Posts tagged Danziger Gallery:

“Youth is happy because it has the capacity to see beauty. Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old.”—Franz Kafka

Mark Cohen, born in 1943, is a native of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. To a 21st Century audience, he’s perhaps not as well known, but for over 40 years he’s been documenting his local community and building a foundation from which many photographers (consciously or not) have tread upon. As early as 1973, John Szarkowski recognized his talent and showed his work for the first time at MoMA. Now, in 2014, the Danziger Gallery in New York is representing his work and giving him a new solo show that opened last week.

Cohen’s flair for using strong off-camera flash, a wide angle lens, and avoiding the viewfinder (while shooting with the camera away from his body) bring an immediacy to his images. Like Bruce Gilden, who’s no stranger to the close, flash-in-your-face approach, Cohen’s surrealistic style is reflective of his personality. This video shows him in action, moving, shooting, talking and constantly on alert for the next frame.

Now in his 70’s, Mark Cohen has kept his ability to see beauty and to remain young. Any photographer who creates work this good (not to mention his superb color work), merits all the attention he receives. The show is up until June 20th and a must-see. Never grow old. —Lane Nevares

“I believe everyone in your dreams represents a psychological aspect of yourself. So the whole Guest group is offered as an extended self-portrait - females and all.”—Chris Bucklow

The Danziger Gallery in New York has recently opened its second solo show of Christopher Bucklow’s arresting photograms. While certainly not a departure, artistically speaking, from his past photographic work, these photograms are nevertheless beautiful to behold. 

Light on paper. Each print is a unique display: the sun’s rays poring through thousands of pinhole apertures in an aluminum foil sheet mapping a human silhouette, each photogram reflecting the length of exposure and intensity of the sun at a given moment. The final result is singular and ethereal, a Cibachrome print that is its own negative. 

Beauty is a worthy pursuit whatever the medium. Bucklow’s love of light and color, along with the psychological underpinnings of this work, give these photograms their staying power. Already part of many major museums and collections, Bucklow’s sun-fueled photographs remind us that it’s ok to believe in our dreams. —Lane Nevares

"One day Paula (my daughter) came back from horseback riding. She took off her cap and I was struck by the image of her hair held together by a hair-net. It reminded me of the portraits by the Dutch masters and I portrayed her in that fashion." Hendrik Kerstens 

Hendrik Kersten’s photographs, particularly this noted series of his daughter, “Paula Pictures,” are known for referencing the work of Vermeer and other great Dutch masters of the 17th Century, while maintaining their delicate sense of light. 

Lots of artists have used their families as models, and of course all of us take pictures of our own kin, but Kersten’s daughter Paula is an engaging subject on her own merits. We see her direct gaze and participate in the performance revealed through an economy of dress and styling—all under gentle, luscious light.

This collaboration results in stunning, humorous, and idiosyncratic portraits with a wonderful dash of Dutch Art History thrown in for flavor. For those who have two minutes, here is a lovely video of the series.  And for those of you in New York, I encourage you to visit the Danziger Gallery to see these large-scale prints for yourself.  Lane Nevares